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20100918
20100918
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
a victory in thursday's u.s. senate republican primary in delaware. she now faces the general election 40 days from now. o'donnell is single, 42 years old with a background in public relations. previously she sought the republican nomination for u.s. senate during the 2006 primaries. four years ago. and she lost. in 2008, two years ago, she gained the uncontested republican nomination for the u.s. senate in the general election, challenging city senator joe biden. biden won by 457,000 to o'donnell's 140,000. biden outspent o'donnell $4.9 million, to o'donnell's $116,000. nearly 32 times 2 times bigger o'donnell's budget. her opponent for the 2010 republican primary for the u.s. senate was michael castle, a nine-and former two-term governor of delaware. >> don't ever understint the power of we, the people. >> two months ago she had no money, no campaign, and many believed in no chance. with a 23% approval rating, she looked like a long shot against the household name of michael castle. but the palin endorsement led to a $600,000 pledge to the o'donnell campaign by the tea party. even after
through literature and you can find out by talking. and you can find out by using your imagination. and for an appelate judge that's important. because when you're in that room, as you are, and writing and reading, what you are goinging to write is going to affect other people. so it's very important to have the imagination to try to understand how your opinions and your decisions will affect the lives of others. >> rose: why are things that you read like literature important to a judge? >> i told a group of undergraduates here in new york a few weeks ago when i was asked that question. and i said it's like knowing a foreign language or reading a novel. we only have one life. and we only really know our own. but by reading novels and by reading what other people have written about life, and about different ways of living, you can lead more lives than your own. and you can understand how people could have lived a quite different life. and that's a wonderful privilege to be able to do that as well as i think a necessity for someone whose's goinging to affect the lives of other people
from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening, and thanks for joining us. susie gharib is off tonight. i'm joined by my colleague suzanne pratt. gold prices have never been this high, suzanne, topping $1,277 an ounce in today's trading. >> suzanne: tom, gold's not the only metal shining on wall street. silver is at a 30-year high, closing at $20.82 an ounce. >> tom: been quite some rally, but the high prices metals are getting aren't scaring off buyers. as scott gurvey reports, the big rally in metals is expected to continue. >> reporter: five records in six weeks. it seems all that glitters on the futures exchanges are contracts in gold. analysts at goldman sachs, the royal bank of scotland and deutsche bank all published research notes making the case for the yellow metal today. analyst jim steel at h.s.b.c. says there are many reasons to expect the trend to continue. >> we still have a lot of financial market fragility, a lot of uncertainty about the economy going forward. we've had the reintroduction of quantitative easing, and we've also had a lot of
than choosing the governor and u.s. senator for california. we'll tell you about other statewide races and issues the voters will decide. >>> proposition 25 would eliminate the two-thirds majority needed to pass a state budget, while proposition 26 would redefine many fees as taxes, requiring a two-thirds vote to pass. and celebrating mexico. an exhibition of photos and rare documents commemorates the bicentennial of mexico's independence and the centennial of the mexican revolution. we'll have those stories next. ♪ >> belva: good evening and welcome to "this week in northern california." i'm belva davis. joining me tonight on our news panel are scott shafer, host of "the california report" on kqed public radio with a look at propositions 25 and 26. and marissa lagos, sacramento reporter for "the san francisco chronicle." on the less publicized races for state office. and we begin with rebecca smith, energy reporter for "the wall street journal." rebecca in the wake of the san bruno fire, there's talk that maybe pg&e has not been as transparent about other pipel e pipelines that mig
the value voters summit. >> the elite don't get us, they call us wacky, they call us wing nuts, we call us "we the people." gwen: defeated republicans like delaware's mike castronevesle, bob bennett and murkowski are trying to figure out what happened. and also arlen specter and struggling incumbents like ohio governor ted strickland and president obama himself who knows he must convince voters the economy can improve. >> we stop the bleeding, stabilize the economy but the fact of the matter is the pace of improvement is not where it needs to be. and the hole we had dug ourselfs in was enormous. gwen: the scary truth appears to be rattled voters appear to lash out at lots of people for lots of reasons. let's go through some of the reasons here, panel. starting with you, john. >> the economy. i'll take the easiest, biggest target, the economy is bad and affecting people in their lives and if it's not affecting them it's affecting somebody in their lives and everybody is anxious. in this time of anxiety they turn to washington and see people they dislike, distrust and are just bafoons. and t
services committee. major business groups also opposed the appointment. david hirschmann of the u.s. chamber of commerce said warren's ideas about regulation could end up hurting consumers. >> the issue is more what will she do with this power. if this is taking away choices for consumers and restricting credit in the marketplace, count us out. >> woodruff: the consumer protection bureau's first task will be a forum on mortgage disclosures next tuesday. for a closer look at elizabeth warren and the new agency she is to get up and running, we turn to two people who have followed developments closely: bert ely is a banking industry consultant who heads his own firm in northern virginia; and lynn stout is professor of corporate and securities law at the university of california, los angeles. thank you batt for being with us. lynn stout i'm going to start with you, we are just heard two voices critical of elizabeth warren, why do you think she is the right person for this job? >> she's very clearly the right person for the job because she thought up the job. elizabeth warren has been tr
, it is the look of the winner in the u.s. presidential election. what ever choice the afghans make it, it will shape their future. bbc news, kabul. >> you're watching "bbc world news." still to come -- the mosque in a box. immobile per unit for the mobile muslim. prince william has graduated as our royal air force search and rescue helicopter pilot. he will now become part of the country's busiest search and rescue base off the coast of wales. >> he spent the past 19 months progressing through the raf training program. there have been stimulated rescue missions, the kind of operation he will soon be doing for real. flights over the atlantic where ships and yachts can run into trouble, and in the mountains of snow dunny aware every year his squadron is called out to -- snowdonia where every year his squadron is called out to rescue. he is now part of an operational rescue squadron, and the raf says he has done it on merit. >> he has completed the course successfully, with at least the minimum standards, if not better than that. he is here on his own right. >> initially, william will be
d won't get you far far because the universities are using these phds as contract employees, these women have a lot of guts but if you look at the fields they are in and i want them to keep pushing because they have broken one barrier, now we've got to break the barriers across the board for phds not only in pushing in other areas, in other fields besides the ones where we beer beginning. >> not only women are they competing against men, they're also competing on a global scale as well. the number of jobs and phds in stem areas, science, technology, engineering, math we are falling behind from foreign pet terse in these areas. we need to boost our workforce overall. i saw a study by the american association of university women that came out this year, that talked about the despair tee between women, why aren't there more women in these fields of studies. still stems back to the gender disparities and stereotype beginning in elementary and middle school. they said, this was combination of several studies looking at the various factors. they showed where teachers and parents got involved a
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)

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